Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar

High Ability Glossary

GLOSSARY OF SOME TERMS USED IN HIGH ABILITY

Accelerated Learning - Pacing students through the curriculum at a rate appropriate to their advanced ability. Students may or may not be formally identified as high ability to participate in some forms of accelerated learning.

Advance College Project (ACP) – An Indiana University dual credit program. See Dual Credit below.

Advanced Placement - Any courses endorsed by the College Board in which a secondary student can earn college credit by successfully meeting criteria established by higher education institutions on a nationally given and scored Advanced Placement examination. Students also earn high school credit upon successful completion of the course(s).

Cluster Grouping – Grouping of several high ability students in a regular classroom with students from a variety of ability or achievement levels.

Differentiation - Adapting the curriculum to meet the unique needs of learners by making modifications in complexity, depth, and pacing. It may include selecting, rather than covering all, the curriculum areas dependent on the individual needs of students. In Indiana Administrative Code, "Differentiated" means providing tiered levels of services for all educational needs.

Dual Credit - Students earn both high school and college credit while enrolled in a course. Early Entrance - Students begin their elementary school or college education prior to the designated chronological age of entrance.

Early Entrance: when students begin their elementary school or college education prior to the designated chronological age of entrance.

Enrichment - Activities that supplement the core curriculum. Such activities are generally not specified in the curriculum and are selected by the teacher and/or students in a given classroom.

Flexible Grouping - Grouping students by ability or readiness level. Groups can be formed and reformed to meet varied instructional purposes. Ability grouping is not synonymous with "tracking."

Flexible Cluster Grouping - Grouping of several high ability students in a classroom. The makeup of the remainder of the class is dependent on the percentage of high ability students in the room. If 50% of the class is high ability, the remainder of the class comprises students of average or high average ability or achievement.

General Intellectual:   understanding facts and concepts, developing skills and generalizations, and evaluating their relationships as they apply to a broad array of disciplines.

Grade Skipping - Students progress through grade level instruction skipping one or more grades.

High Ability Student - In Indiana Code "high ability student" means a student who performs at, or shows the potential for performing at, an outstanding level of accomplishment in at least one (1) domain when compared to other students of the same age, experience, or environment, and is characterized by exceptional gifts, talents, motivation, or interests. (Indiana Code 20-36-1-3)

Honors Classes at the middle school/junior high or high school level in which content, pace, or depth of instruction is accelerated. Traditionally, students who meet prerequisite criteria are accepted into these courses.

Qualitative Assessment: Measures that provide more descriptive information about a child’s ability or performance in a given area such as portfolio, rating scales. They are not tests. 

Socio-emotional: The social and emotional needs of the student; affective domain. 

Specific Academic: One of the domains of high ability. “Specific academic” means understanding facts and concepts, developing skills and generalizations, and evaluating their relationships as they apply to specific disciplines, such as English language arts, social studies, foreign languages, mathematics, and sciences. 

Standardized Test: A standardized test is one that is administered under standardized or controlled conditions that specify where, when, how, and for how long children may respond to the test items. Standardized tests should meet acceptable standards for technical qualities in construction, administration, and use.

Twice-Exceptional: Students with needs and characteristics of more than one special population, e.g. gifted and learning disabled. 

Underachieving: A discrepancy between recognized potential and actual academic performance. The causes of underachievement may be social, emotional, physical, and/or academic. 

Validity: The degree to which a test/assessment measures what it purports to measure. 

Adapted in part from the Indiana Association for the Gifted (IAG) Resource Guide for Indiana Parents and Teachers, 2nd Edition R

(for an indepth list of terms used in high ability)